Word Power Books

Book Search

A value is required.

Word Power Books
Word Power Books

TOP 10 BOOKS

Word Power Books

Unstated

Scott Hames

£12.99

More Info
Word Power Books

The Liberty Tree

Murray Armstrong

£11.99

More Info
Word Power Books

Inspired by Independence

National Collective

£25.00

More Info
Word Power Books

Yes

James Foley

£9.00

More Info
Word Power Books

Arguing for Independence

Stephen Maxwell

£7.99

More Info
Word Power Books

Something Chronic

Bob Cant

£8.99

More Info
Word Power Books

Outside the Narrative

Tom Leonard

£11.99

More Info
Word Power Books

Scotland Yet

Jack Foster

£13.99

More Info
Word Power Books

Inspiring Women

STUC Women's Committee

£7.99

More Info
Word Power Books

Scottish Independence

Cat Boyd

£6.99

More Info
Word Power Books

Rabindranath Tagore as an English Writer: New Perspectives and Research - A talk by Professor Uma Das Gupta, Historian and Tagore Biographer

Rabindranath Tagore as an English Writer: New Perspectives and Research - A talk by Professor Uma Das Gupta, Historian and Tagore Biographer

Thursday 12 May 2011 at 6.00pm (doors open 5.30pm)

Lindsay Stewart Lecture Theatre
Craiglockhart Campus
Edinburgh Napier University 
Edinburgh
EH14 1DJ

Admission Free!

All Welcome!

Whilst Rabindranath Tagore's Bengali mother tongue was his language of choice for his literary expressions and creativity, he also wrote substantially in English. In his early fifties, he turned himself into a pro-active bilingual writer by translating a group of his poems which became his English Gitanjali – the Bengali book for which he received Nobel Prize for Literature - and much more.

Uma Dasgupta will show how his English writings opened a window to his friendships in the West, which encouraged him in his unrelenting quest for a civilisational meeting of the races towards a reconciled universe. Where truth is concerned, he courageously declared, there could be no question of East and West. Access to the world's fountain of knowledge was essential. Visva-Bharati, his International University, was conceived to break out of this isolation.

His friends from the West became partners in this effort. There were two Edinburgh stalwarts among them, Patrick Geddes and his son Arthur Geddes, who served Rabindranath's experiments in rural reconstruction at Visva-Bharati during the years 1921 and 1923. This paper will explore the ideas of Geddes and Tagore as it looks at possibilities of new perspectives in research on this seminal friendship.