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Christopher Whyte / Crisdean MacIlleBhain launches his new book of poems, DEALBH ATHAR / PORTRAIT OF A FATHER, with Irish translations by Greagoir O Duill, in Edinburgh, Scotland

Christopher Whyte / Crìsdean MacIlleBhàin launches his new book of poems,  DEALBH ATHAR / PORTRAIT OF A FATHER , with Irish translations by Gréagóir Ó Dúill, in Edinburgh, Scotland

Thursday 23 April 2009 at 7.00pm

Venue:
Word Power Books
43-45 West Nicolson Street
Edinburgh
EH8 9DB
Scotland

Admission Free!

All Welcome!

Reading, discussion and a glass of wine for everyone!
 
Christopher Whyte taught at Rome University in the 1980s, then was Reader in Scottish Literature at Glasgow University till 2005. He now lives and writes full-time in Budapest. Poet, fiction-writer, translator and critic, two of his four novels gained Scottish Arts Council

Dealbh Athar / Portrait of a Father by Crìsdean MacIlleBhàin (Christopher Whyte) with translations into Irish by Gréagóir Ó Dúill is a carefully arranged collection of poems written over nearly 20 years dealing with the problematic aftermath of sexual abuse in a dysfunctional family. Ronald Black wrote in the Scotsman of the poem at its core, ‘Aig uaigh nach eil ann’ (‘At a grave that does not exist’), that these lines will continue to be read for as long as the Gaelic language lives.